Peru’s Prime Minister calls for vote of confidence in his cabinet before Congress

This Wednesday, Congress is debating whether or not it will give its vote of confidence to the president’s cabinet, led by Prime Minister Gustavo Adrianzén.

Litmus test for the government of Peru’s President Dina Boluarte.

This Wednesday, Congress is debating whether or not to grant its vote of confidence to the president’s cabinet, led by Prime Minister Gustavo Adrianzén.

In the midst of a new political crisis due to the “Rolexgate” affair, which involves President Dina Boluarte and after six changes of government, Adrianzén addressed the unicameral Parliament with a long speech, to ask for the measure that would allow or not the government team to continue carrying out its functions.

During his speech, Adrianzén announced new economic and security policies, including strengthening the deployment of police on the country’s streets. However, he did not mention the scandal which shook the head of state in the so-called “Rolexgate” affair.

Peruvian President Dina Boluarte speaks to the public during an aid program for the elderly, in Lima, February 22, 2024. Photo: Reuters

“We will apply a tough security policy whose results we hope can be appreciated as soon as possible (…) We will not tolerate crimes that intimidate Peruvians and that affect our development. No national or foreign criminal will generate chaos and fear in our society,” said the Peruvian Prime Minister.

Adrianzén assumed the presidency of the Council of Ministers on March 6 and recently the president appointed a total of six new holders in the different government portfolios.

The Peruvian Constitution states that within 30 days of implementing the changes, you must go to Congress to request a vote of confidence. parliamentarians. But in the current context, the challenge is enormous.

To obtain parliamentary authorization, Adrianzén needs a simple majority in the vote. If he does not get support, he will have to resign and Boluarte will have to appoint a new cabinet. And if it is rejected again, the president could close Congress, since only two votes are allowed.

Peru’s parliament is controlled by a majority of right-wing and far-right parties, supported by Boluarte, a leader who does not have her own seat.

The Prosecutor’s Office searched Boluarte’s home and the Government Palace in the early hours of Friday to Saturday of Holy Week.

During his speech there, Adrianzén also called for the unity of his country, political sectors and government institutions.

“Peru has struggled to maintain and preserve its democratic institutions. It is our duty to defend and strengthen it, promoting peace, dialogue and mutual respect among Peruvians, without discrimination of any kind,” said the official, in statements reported by the local newspaper El Comercio.

Furthermore, the Prime Minister defended that the new cabinet “represents the convergence and unity of political forces that believe in democracy.”

Adrianzén’s intervention in Congress comes in the middle of a crisis triggered by an investigation into the acquisition of several luxury watches from the Rolex brand that, according to authorities, Boluarte did not declare.

Peru’s attorney general said Tuesday that the investigation into the president had been expanded to include a Cartier bracelet worth $56,000 in her possession and 1.1 million soles (about $298,000) in bank deposits of “unknown origin”.

When the controversy arose, the prosecutor’s office carried out a search of Boluarte’s home and the Government Palace in the early hours of Friday to Saturday of Holy Week, as part of this investigation.

Source: Latercera

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